Everything You Need To Know About Wastewater Treatment Process

In most cases, the goal of wastewater treatment is to allow industrial and human wastes to be disposed of without endangering the natural environment and human health. Each day, wastewater goes down drains and toilets in businesses, homes, factories, and schools and then flows into various sewer systems. Wastewater treatment New Zealand has to offer consists of biological, physical, and chemical processes and operations to eliminate organic matter and solids from waste water.

In many wastewater treatment plants, biological and physical processes duplicate how rivers, lakes, wetlands, and streams naturally purify water. Wastewater treatment in New Zealand can be done in 5 main stages: primary treatment, disinfection, secondary treatment, preliminary treatment, and sludge treatment (not in order).

Wastewater treatment process:

Preliminary treatment

Wastewater treatment New Zealand has to offer can be a long and complex process. Wastewater from various sources flows into the treatment plants. It passes through the screens made of upright bars, placed 1 to 3 inches apart. The bars eliminate solid materials such as rags, bottles, and newspapers. This protects essential equipment like the sewage pumps. The trapped materials are then moved to landfills. Click here Parklink Ltd

Primary treatment

Wastewater moves to sedimentation tanks also known as primary settling tanks. Here, water flows at a slow speed allowing the lighter waste materials such as grease to float and the heavier ones to settle at the bottom. The primary sludge (settled solids) is separated out into sand, gravel, and grit. The grit is then taken to landfills after being washed. The remaining materials (gravel and sand) are pumped to the sludge handling materials of the plant for further processing. The wastewater (partially treated) flows to the next stage.

Secondary treatment

For processes such as New Zealand wastewater treatment to be successful, this stage must be done perfectly. Air is pumped into aeration tanks to mix sludge and wastewater. This enhances the growth of tiny organisms and oxygen-using bacteria that naturally occur in the sewage. The remaining organic materials are consumed by these microorganisms. As a result, heavier particles are produced. Wastewater spends about 3 to 6 hours in the bubbling tanks.

The aerated wastewater moves to the last settling tanks where the heavy solid particles settle as secondary sludge. Some of it may return to aeration tanks to enhance the activated sludge process. The re-circulated sludge contains many microorganisms that promote the removal of remaining pollutants. The other secondary sludge is taken to sludge handling facilities for further processing.

Disinfection

Even after secondary and primary treatment, the disease-causing microorganism may remain within the treated wastewater. Any wastewater treatment New Zealand has to offer should involve chlorine-contact tanks where the treated wastewater can mix with sodium hypochlorite to kill harmful microorganisms. The treated liquid can be allowed to flow into local waterways.

Sludge treatment:

Thickening and digestion

The end-product (sludge) of both secondary and primary treatment is around 99% water and should be concentrated for further processing. While in the thickening tanks, the sludge separates from the liquid. Water returns to the aeration container for further treatment. During the digestion process, most of the thickened sludge is converted into water, methane, and carbon dioxide. The methane gas produced can be used as an energy source. Referrals from co-workers can help you find wastewater treatment New Zealand experts now provide.

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